Maximum Grilled Steelers Forum
Jul 28, 2014 at 01:39 *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
  Home   Forum   Help Calendar Media Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2] 3 ... 8   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Sustainable Food Thread  (Read 13439 times)
otismalibu
Global Moderator
Old School Member
*****

Karma: 7051
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,879



« Reply #10 on: Oct 19, 2007 at 16:43 »

Mrs. Finny - Ya know what?
Finny - Huh?
Mrs. Finny - I'm feelin' like I might want to source some raw cream, if you know what I mean.
Finny - Let me get at ya!!
Logged
Finnegans Wake
Global Moderator
Old School Member
*****

Karma: 12188
Offline Offline

Posts: 22,198



« Reply #11 on: Oct 21, 2007 at 08:41 »

Quote
Finny - Let me get at ya!!
A phrase actually used in the Finny household.  What passes for foreplay amongst marrieds...
Logged

Out of my mind on Saturday night...
Burton
Member
***

Karma: 447
Offline Offline

Posts: 415


WWW
« Reply #12 on: Oct 21, 2007 at 10:23 »

Quote


What does your research say about living off of protein bars/powder?  I don't really do that, but I did last week.  Seemed much much better than soft pretzels, frozen lemonade, turkey legs, french fries (there were little McDonald shacks that sold only french fries), Mickey ice cream bars, etc.
It's not ideal, but if you must, it'd probably be better than shit from mcdonalds and such.  I mainly say this due to the fact that most protein powders and bars are nutritionally deficient in at least one area.  If one were to subside solely on powders, it would be likely that their fat and carb intake would be sorely deficient.  Especially with regards to healthy fats.  There are certain brands that to help with this, as there are brands that do have MCTs thrown in them, which is definitely a good thing, but still not broad spectrum enough.  Additionally, MRPs will have carbs and fats, but they are only meant to replace meals once in a while, maybe once a day as opposed to every meal.  Not to mention the fact that powders and bars are going to leave you hungry all day, which would probably lead to overeating, calorie wise, or just being miserable.

Oh, by the way, most bars are shit.  Most of them have soy protein in them, which is a horrible idea for anyone with testicles, unless you are allergic to whey or casein.  And past that, they claim to have "whey protein" in them, but most have some terrible percent (most are less than 20) and the rest of it is pumped full of soy protein isolate.  Additionally, the types of whey they will put in them are often the worst quality to increase profit margins.

Also, wrt to proteins of the whey/soy variety.  If you're trying to not lose muscle mass, as I am, this is a bad idea because generally speaking, whey is really only bioavailable for around an hour, maybe 2 at most.  Casein is longer, but generally speaking cost significantly more than its whey protein counterparts.  

If you want some reccomendations as to what protein to get if you actually want something nutritionally sound if you have to do this, I can give you some ideas.  I also have some recipes for homemade protein bars that are sound.  They all taste kinda shitty but are much better than what you could do at stores.  Since once in stores are kinda shitty anyway, dont consider it a big deal.  The only problem with most of the recipes I can give you is that they depend entirely on the protein you put in them, taste wise and they can tend to get dry.  Mainly since cooking with protein powders tends to dry things out anyway, but if you want the help with solid products, I can give you some reccomendations.  
Logged

P4P: 2:26AM. Drunk as hall. Blurd vission. Nobody to bithc to. Fuick!!

Shine on you crazy diamond, shine on.
Finnegans Wake
Global Moderator
Old School Member
*****

Karma: 12188
Offline Offline

Posts: 22,198



« Reply #13 on: Oct 22, 2007 at 10:21 »

Bottom line is, when you have any kind of "meal replacements," whether from energy bars or protein bars or vats of protein, you're divorcing individual nutrients from the full spectrum of nutrients that real foods provide.  

Sometimes, these nutrients work in concert, so getting one in isolation may not be the most effective way to incorporate the nutrient into your diet.  The B-complex vitamins work this way; there's some research to say that eggs are healthy if you eat both yolk and white, as there is a symbiosis of needed elements there; the array of nutrients that we are aware of is constantly growing, from the basic vitmains and minerals, to flavonoids and polyphenols and other micronutrients that can't just be dumped into breakfast cereals and power bars.

The other issue with processing is that dried milk and dried eggs in various products are too easily radicalized, and create an oxidant effect when consumed.  Whole foods, real foods, are less susceptible to that.
Logged

Out of my mind on Saturday night...
Finnegans Wake
Global Moderator
Old School Member
*****

Karma: 12188
Offline Offline

Posts: 22,198



« Reply #14 on: Nov 20, 2007 at 11:12 »

Friend of mine just sent this.  Nice to know Eddie Rendell and his cohorts are out to protect agribusiness from those pesky customers.  Who needs to know about hormones in milk?

Quote
Christmas Comes Early for Monsanto

As you busily prepare for the holidays this year, you may (or may not) be comforted to discover that buying food for such seasonal celebrations will become easier in 2008, at least in Pennsylvania.  That
Logged

Out of my mind on Saturday night...
Finnegans Wake
Global Moderator
Old School Member
*****

Karma: 12188
Offline Offline

Posts: 22,198



« Reply #15 on: Jun 26, 2008 at 13:46 »

Last year was a bit of a dry run for the Finny family doing sustainable/local.  This year's updates:

*Loving the CSA.  That's Community Supported Agriculture.  What it means is, every year you kick out a set price to some hippy farmers (or more likely, some ex-lawyers with big dreams of moving to the country and owning a farm), and every week you get a surprise box of veggies and maybe fruit.  All organic, no pesiticides or herbicides.  We tried it for a little less than half a year last year, getting the half share, which was plenty for us two.

This year, we started getting mostly salad greens a few weeks ago, but since we're hitting the beginning of the season, we're getting the real boom of good stuff this time.  We've had some zucchini and squash, greenhouse tomatoes, carrots, salad stuff, onions...  And at under $15 a week, with food prices rising, it's a great deal.  This stuff was in the ground the day before, not ripened in some cross-country truck ride.  I encourage everyone to try this idea out.  Check www.localharvest.org.

*Getting ready to buy more beef.  Down to some ground beef and one chuck roast, so time to head out to Lil Ponderosa and check out what Otis's buddy Farmer Bob has to sell.  Again, food prices are going up, but I don't think Bob's are.  He doesn't add in shipping costs, and he doesn't feed the cattle corn, just nice clean grass.  I saw there was another E. Coli scare, in Michigan IIRC?  Heck with that.

*Local orchard.  For our everyday veggie consumption, the CSA is more than enough.  BUt we still go to the orchard, even though they're not organic, to fill in any gaps.  For example, the orchard has had beets, strawberries, blueberries, asparagus, and hull peas.  The Mrs. and I are going to freeze a lot more local fresh stuff.  She thinks the local peas are 100x better than anything shipped in, and when you cut these strawberries, they're red all the way through.  Super tasty, full of antioxidants, not like those big white ones that are only red on the very outside.  How much nutrition do those berries really have?  

It's important to get the items with shorter windows (asparagus, peas) while you can.  

 
Logged

Out of my mind on Saturday night...
jonzr
Asst. VP, Jonzring
Global Moderator
Old School Member
*****

Karma: 11361
Offline Offline

Posts: 11,395


Have a cup o' joe.


WWW
« Reply #16 on: Aug 01, 2008 at 11:24 »

I've been working to get a garden bed ready for next spring, perhaps even this fall if I can think of fall produce to grow in this area.  Perhaps lettuce or greens and such.  

For the last few years I just planted some tomatoes and peppers in a small area (8X4 or so) at the back of the yard and did the same this year plus some more in containers on the porch.  Nothing has grown well this season, though.  I've read lately that one shouldn't continue planting tomatoes in the same area year after year so that could be the problem.  I always figured that crop rotation was just for the big farms, maybe not.  Could also be the high temps and lack of rain for the last 6 weeks.

So, the new bed is 8X24 in the middle of the back yard.  I came across this method called "lasagna gardening" and decided to give it a shot.  It's a no-till approach of building a bed by layers, starting with newspaper on the bottom to aid in killing off the grass.  You then add grass clippings, dried leaves and alternate layers with peat moss.  I added a cubic yard of compost last week.  My lasagna is about 6" at this point.  Am hoping to continue adding layers though the fall and winter and will hopefully have a nice rich bed of material to plant in next spring.

Am considering using the smaller tomato plot for an asparagus bed.  Have heard it's hard to grow though.
 
Logged

"I like David Bowie, he was always my favorite member of Tin Machine."
- Rodney Anonymous

It's a Steeler Nation
otismalibu
Global Moderator
Old School Member
*****

Karma: 7051
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,879



« Reply #17 on: Aug 01, 2008 at 11:59 »

Quote
My lasagna is about 6" at this point.

A common temporary condition, caused by opting for natural childbirth.

Give it time.
Logged
Finnegans Wake
Global Moderator
Old School Member
*****

Karma: 12188
Offline Offline

Posts: 22,198



« Reply #18 on: Aug 01, 2008 at 12:25 »

I've read about that method, jonzr.  Grass roots are pretty tough, so it'll be interesting to see if this works.

Our soil is horrible.  First year here, I tore down some old kiddie play fort thingey, which was great fun, fighting off carpenter bees.  Then I went to dig up the ground for the garden: all rock.  Well, not all.  There were these giant concrete anchors (dog kennel, maybe?), plus fucking tree roots that I pulled out by hand.  Killed my back, just destroyed it.  After a few years of giving the soil compost, it started to get pretty decent.  Then I tried making raised beds with plywood, but they bowed and seasoned not well at all.  Mrs. F. hated them.  So last year, I tore down the raised beds, made nicer looking ones on the other side of the yard so Mrs. F. could have a patio/sitting area where the garden was, and I was not about to give up my good soil, so I trudged it across the yard in wheelbarrows, about 8 billion trips.  

I've found the soil is good enough that I don't need to rotate tomatoes.  

Back behind the sitting area, I did put in an asparagus bed and some blueberries, but it's really in need of weeding.  You have to be patient with asparagus, is all.

Some late season stuff you can plant: definitely some lettuce, peas; you can plant stuff to winter over, like onions, carrots, garlic, parsnips, leeks.

I'd say to compost and mulch as much as possible, and avoid chemical fertilizers like Miracle Grow.  Good short-term, bad long-term: burn your roots out.
Logged

Out of my mind on Saturday night...
jonzr
Asst. VP, Jonzring
Global Moderator
Old School Member
*****

Karma: 11361
Offline Offline

Posts: 11,395


Have a cup o' joe.


WWW
« Reply #19 on: Aug 01, 2008 at 13:29 »

Quote
Some late season stuff you can plant: definitely some lettuce, peas; you can plant stuff to winter over, like onions, carrots, garlic, parsnips, leeks.

I'd say to compost and mulch as much as possible, and avoid chemical fertilizers like Miracle Grow.  Good short-term, bad long-term: burn your roots out.
I'll have to try those if they'll wait until Sept or Oct.  Have never planted stuff in the fall so that'll take a little reading to figure out.  TX A&M seems to have some decent online resources for what grows in this zone, but they're more oriented to the commercial farmer.  Still, should be some stuff to glean.

Am planning to read up on asparagus and from initial research have heard to not expect much the first season.  And it seems like it likes hay or straw.  Whatever it is I'll give it a good shot.

Also have an herb bed by the house, it's been doing well for a few years, but the oregano is out of hand - will containerize that stuff, it'll choaking out the thyme and moving in on the basil, the poor bastards.  Plus, the bees really love it.  And my dog loves to eat bees, the stupid bitch.  She's paid the hard way a few times but keeps going back for more.
 
Logged

"I like David Bowie, he was always my favorite member of Tin Machine."
- Rodney Anonymous

It's a Steeler Nation
Pages: 1 [2] 3 ... 8   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
| Sitemap
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!