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Author Topic: Buying first home  (Read 2669 times)
SCacalaki
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« on: Jul 13, 2008 at 09:28 »

Seller accepted the offer late Friday.

Should close on 8/14, if everything goes well.

Home inspection next week...any thoughts or experiences that might help the process?  Any areas that you wish the inspector had looked into further when you purchased?

I'll start requesting the past 6-8 months of check stub copies from work (I had usually shredded them) and compiled bank statments.  Any guess how far back the lending or title company will need them?  I've heard they will come back up

Have to check into homeowners' ins. pretty quickly and get that set up.

No closing costs contributed on my side of the deal.

Lots of paperwork was signed/initialed prior to the offer being submitted to the seller...much more at closing.  

Any thoughts on making the closing easier?
 
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« Reply #1 on: Jul 13, 2008 at 12:31 »

We're currently in the second home we've purchased so I can't offer much, but here's what I can:

Let's see, seems like the title company wanted as much info as one could provide.  Check stubs as far back as possible.  They'll want to know your current debt situation with car payments, credit cards, loans, etc.  Get this stuff as organized as possible to speed the process.  You may need your SS card, DL, etc.  Call 'em up and ask what they expect you to bring.

Make sure the inspector checks air conditioning units (our home has two units and one was whacked, they had to fix it before we closed), plumbing - be sure to find where the clean outs are located, you'll need to know eventually.  Same thing for the exhaust from your dryer hookup.  Turns out that ours vents on our roof; in any case, you'll want to know where it is and keep that sucker clean for efficiency and safety purposes (fire hazard).  In our first home, the dryer didn't even vent outside and we had to do that ourselves.  Don't know what the previous owner did.  But the inspector didn't catch that.  Toilets should flush quickly and a tub full of water should drain in a reasonable time.

All inspectors are not created equally.  Got recommendations for the next one and that sucker was a pro, didn't miss a frigging thing in our current home.

You'll certainly want to be aware of property boundaries.  And, who's fence is that?  Is it on my property or the neighbor's property?  Do we share it?  This may be up to your localities codes and such.

The roof is very important, hopefully that's in good shape.  Foundation should be in good shape - doors should not jam, windows should open easily, etc.

Oh yeah, wiring, outlets and the breaker box.  Depending on the age of your new home the wiring could be shit.  Hopefully all the outlets are grounded properly and breakers are all of sufficient amperage or whatever.

Garage door openers.  Hmm.  Can't think of much else at the moment.

Oh, is there a home owner's association that you'll have to pay dues to?  That was a big deal for me - I absolutely refused to buy a home under such conditions - have heard horror stories about the nazis that sit on those committees.  But it may be unavoidable.

Good luck dude.  You're picking a great time to buy a home, that's for sure.
 
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« Reply #2 on: Jul 13, 2008 at 14:30 »

Pray for good neighbors.  
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« Reply #3 on: Jul 13, 2008 at 16:32 »

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Pray for good neighbors.
Fuckin' A right.  

After several abortive apartment experiences, hellish neighbors, we lucked into having great neighbors all around, all up and down the street, really.  

I don't remember it being a difficult process.  I know I didn't cough up a pile of pay stubs.  In fact, it was all very smooth...  Part of that may have been that we pre-qualified with our lender, so when we were ready to make an offer it was just "Sign here... and here... initial here... don't worry about reading that, just sign..." what seemed like 1000 pages.  

As for the home inspection, IMO that's just going to point out major & obvious shit.  We spent so long looking at... housing dreck... that I got pretty good at seeing the bones myself.  Before we pre-qualified, I had seriously lowballed what we could afford, so we were looking at houses that needed a lot of help.  Our lender was like, "No, man, you can buy houses in THIS range..."  That changed everything.  Our home came up as an open house, we went head to head with another buyer and won.  Looking back on it, we really got a nice small Cape Cod for... peanuts.  Even with the housing bust, we paid so little, in retrospect.  Being house poor is not a good idea, IMO, so I'm happy with a modest house that we can easily afford.

Anyway.  

You buying near Baltimore?

How's the electrical?  200A throughout, all working recepts?  What kind of piping, copper or PVC?  Age of home, condition of foundation?  I prefer older homes, just seems like for the inevitable quirks they're sturdier.  May need upgrades, but drywall is thicker, framing better, etc.  Look for any drywall cracks for settling: minor cracks are OK, but you see some bigger shit, the foundation is whack.  White wood anywhere = water leaks.  Any roof leaks or basements leaks could spell trouble.  Condition and age of HVAC?  Of the roof?  Any immediate updates required?  Did previous owner leave any record of termite inspections?  Are you in a flood plain?  

You have to apply more subjective criteria for location issues: transit, noise, backyard/green space, proximity to necessities, downstream issues like schools, etc.

In short, I think you'll be fine with the financials.  Seriously.  But make sure the house is what you want.  Mrs. F. had this emotional reaction, which was, "This is the place."  My reaction was bifurcated: "Yeah, this could be the place; how solid is the bitch?"  I have been pleased, and have invested some time in small projects, but luckily have not had any major issues 8 years in.  

The one question of property lines is well worth clarifying: get the exact corners flagged if you can.  We have a row of old white pines at the back of our property that are awesome, tall, and at one time were likely northside windbreaks.  But with age, they lose limbs, more with each winter.  Beyond the mess of cleanup, which is more substantial than one would imagine, the inevitable question of taking them out looms: one day, they're just gonna go.  Being right on the property line means, do they go onto a neighbor's house?  Do they rip down power lines?  And I foresee several grand in removal costs.  You have to be cognizant of all that when you're signing.

It's a lot to take in, but don't be overwhelmed.  I love being a homeowner, and doing the whole Lowe's/HD thing and fixing this or that.  Never was good at it; learned.  You just do, you just figure it out and do it.  Plumbing, electrical, drywall, whatever.  

And the great part is this.  Once you own a home, your personal wealth paradigm changes irrevocably.  Yeah, you're beholden to the bank.  But it's like freezing time... your "rent" never goes up.  Your credit rating does.  Suddenly, as long as you manage your finances with any intelligence, you're golden.  You're investing in your own future wealth, your own equity, rather than making some landlord rich.  I know this is a bad time to say that buying a house is a wonderful thing, in the middle of Foreclosures, USA, but it is.  You're arriving, or on your way to arriving.
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« Reply #4 on: Jul 13, 2008 at 16:56 »

Buying in downtown Baltimore...near the Hopkins campus.  Which means my wife takes the free Hopkins shuttle in to work and I walk to work.  It's the same neighborhood that we've been renting in for the past year.

It's an old home...built somewhere in the 1920s.

Completely gutted and rehabbed.  New roof, new electrical, plumbing, HVAC, appliances, paint lighting, etc.  Still, I need it all checked out.

Termite inspection will be included.  Some wood, though mostly brick.

A very quiet street.

Thanks for the heads up on the clean outs (I could google but what are they) and the property lines.  Those are things I hadn't thought of.  I didn't look but believe I know where the exhaust for the dryer is.  

No garage (on-street parking), which sucks but it's the city so it's more the norm.

No HOA, though there is a local tax that provides a security service for the neighborhood.  In Baltimore, that's a good thing.  Also have an ADT system in the house, which I hope saves $$ on insurance.

Fin, great questoins on the pipes and foundation...definite ly stuff (along with jonrz's above) that I'll take to the inspection.

The roof is new but when we were in the place two weeks ago, there did appear to be water damage in one of the upstairs bedroom's ceiling.  I brought that to the attention of the agent and seller.  

No yard to speak of, other than a patch of grass in the back, with a nice new fence around it.  A deck off of the 2nd floor, so we plan to create some type of patio under it and do a bit more small landscaping.  No trees, we've thought about putting one of those smaller Asian trees in the back yard (Japanese maple?).

No front yard at all...just a side walk out front.  It's a rowhouse.

Schools suck, but all public schools in Baltimore City do.

Neighbors seem okay though I've only met the one's on either side.  Elderly lady on one side and young family on the other.  

We're excited.  Also nervous at such a large financial commitment...but millions of people enter the same type of agreement and are fine.  So there is no reason we can't make it work.

We're lucky to have really good credit.  So I hope that means less prodding from the title/lender co.  But we'll have our stuff ready.

I have to contact my landlord to tell him of our plans.  Our lease doesn't say much about what happens if we break the lease.  I think we'll try to find another renter 'cause the landlord is a decent guy.  
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« Reply #5 on: Jul 13, 2008 at 18:38 »

Congrats, man.  Sounds like it could be very cool.

Detached?  Or "semi-"?

1920s sounds like a very interesting type of property, esp. if reno'ed.  Character, etc.

What's your SF?

Well, you're in enemy territory now, man...  :)




 
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« Reply #6 on: Jul 13, 2008 at 18:47 »

I guess it's classified as semi-detached...maybe????  Have neighbors adjoining on both sides.

1800SF.  

Thanks for the info and tips.  Other than getting married, it's my first "grown-up" decision..or at least that's what it feels like.  Purchasing a car (I've done twice) seems like a walk in the park compared to purchasing a home.

If you think of anything I should ask at the inspection, please send it my way.  I'm taking a lot of the points you and jonrz mentioned to the inspection.  

Yep, enemy territory.  Lots of Steelers fans though, which most Baltimorons will eagerly complain about.  
 
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« Reply #7 on: Jul 13, 2008 at 22:40 »

If it doesnt already come with one, i would highly recommend purchasing a Home Warranty.  its good for a year and you can usually get those for $400 beans.  some you can even pay for monthly so it isnt such a big bite to go along with the many other purchases you will be making in the next few months.

Im sure you will find most problems will crop up within the first year or at least the ones that your inspector may have missed.  the deductible is usually around the $50 dollar range for any time something goes wrong.

I had the house i currently live in inspected and everything the dude said was wrong was repaired before hand.  one thing he failed to mention was the condition of some of the windows...he just said they were average.  i guess by average he meant total shit come winter time.  I would have any inspector check those bad boys very thoroughly.

other than that...buy some ben-gay for the enormous cramp you will get when you sign your life on the X about a billion times.
 
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« Reply #8 on: Jul 14, 2008 at 06:16 »

Congrats SC. We bought our home (our first, and current) over ten years ago, things have changed since then, I am sure. I doubt I can be much help. Just wanted to offer my congratulations.
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« Reply #9 on: Jul 14, 2008 at 08:05 »

I can only add one item, in addition to what has been suggested.  A friend bought a home from that time frame, and the main water line going into the house was a lead pipe.  That had to be changed, and was quite a process.

Make sure everything is to CURRENT "code", especially the electical.  The electric box/panel should have current connections/breakers.  At least up to whatever code is.
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« Reply #10 on: Jul 14, 2008 at 09:16 »

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Pray for good neighbors.

 No need to pray anymore...just check this site.

http://www.rottenneighbor.com/

Some of the stuff people say is hiralious.
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« Reply #11 on: Jul 14, 2008 at 20:42 »

We will have a home warranty and it sounds similar to the one you discuss....$55 deductible.

The lender rep says she wants two recent pay stubs (I was thinking 6 months worth), 2 months of bank statements (I was thinking six), and the name of our current and previous landlord/management co.  Grad school transcripts for my wife since she wasn't technically employed prior to last June.  Copies of drivers licenses, etc.

My work gives $1K to us for the closing costs, which will help cover the escrow for taxes/ins.  

Locked in my rate today, which meant it went up from the good faith estimate.  I assume that's how the lending co. gets you in the door...then gets the % they really want.  Talk from the lender about the seller paying to buy down points.  I dunno.  Guess that's okay.  Though it comes from the closing cost $$$ the seller is providing.  But the $1K from my company and the $1K deposit we put down should keep us from paying much, if anything, on closing day.

Inspection is this Thursday.  Hopefullly it goes well.
« Last Edit: Jul 14, 2008 at 20:48 by SCacalaki » Logged

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« Reply #12 on: Jul 15, 2008 at 08:25 »

I remember that when we pre-qualified with our lender, that locked in our rate for a period, so we didn't have that fluctuation.  Could be normal, though.  Nice of the employer to helpw tih closing costs, they seem to pile on like distant cousins at the wedding open bar.  

One late consideration: I assume you smart people have run a few points scenarios.  Depending on your purchase price, type of loan, and term, points could be something to spend some cash on.  (I would hope you went for a fixed-rate, given the market volatility.)   You do your CBA, see how much paying points would save per month and then amortized over the life.  We paid some points (tax deductible, BTW) to get a better rate, and would up re-financing a couple years later anyway.  The point is, you have to ask yourself how long you plan on being there, whether you have need for liquidity for other costs, etc.

For example: if the place doesn't transfer appliances as part of the sale, what is your estimated cost for range, W/D, refrig?  Then you're weighing the long-term bennies of points versus the short-term ding of throwing crap on credit cards.  (If you can borrow, scrounge, or beg for cash, now would be the time to do it.)  We bought a fridge and W/D, and a few other things (TV, lawnmower, etc.), and figured a few grand would be easy enough to pay off.  But you do what normal folks do, and charge a little bit here and there, and soon enough it becomes a semi-permanent debt, where you're paying so much per year for the right to have purchased the shit in the first place.  What's the point of finding best value of a fridge if you offset with CC fees?  So try to avoid that.  Eat beans and hot dogs every night if you have to, but avoid the niggling high-int debt.

 
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« Reply #13 on: Jul 15, 2008 at 17:18 »

We are paying points.  Maybe 5/8s????

I discussed it with the lender rep and it seemed like a good idea.  

Luckily, the seller is covering appliances (as well as the closing and 3% downpayment).  We thought about putting down another $5K for a downpayment but our agent (much as you allude to) mentioned all of the things we would want to get for our house (eg, yard equipment, new TV, chairs, etc.  Just paid off the last of the CC today from various trips this summer.  Don't want to add to it any time soon.  Biggest remaining debt is student loans...but the education is why we're able to buy a house, so it's a wash I guess.  

Definitely a fixed rate...wish we were doing (ie, could afford) a 15 year.  
 
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« Reply #14 on: Jul 15, 2008 at 17:56 »

No matter how well you go over the house, you'll always find some things that are kinda fucked up after the fact. Usually not any biggies, just annoying little things you may want to tweak or fix.

But it sure beats paying rent.

I think we put $3K down on our first house, down in AL. Eight years later we bough this house (3rd) and had enough of a down payment to buy our first house cash. Luckily, they were all work moves for the Mrs. and closing costs and moving expenses were covered by the companies.

And it sounds like you'll have limited yard work.  :D  
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« Reply #15 on: Jul 16, 2008 at 10:24 »

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Definitely a fixed rate...wish we were doing (ie, could afford) a 15 year.
We just recently did a temporary home equity loan to consolidate and pay off some decent sized debts.  Other than a car loan and student loans, that will now be our only debt.  

We went with the home equity because we're planning on doing some final touchups on the existing home, putting it on the market, selling it (*crosses fingers*) and moving to a neighboring town with a better school system.  We really need to do it in the next 6 (12 at the latest) months because my daughter will be in elementary school next fall.  We went the home equity route because in the short term, the rates are so damn appealing.  We're getting prime minus 1.25% which ends up being 3.75%.

Again, this works for us because it's a short term fix.  Once we touch up and sell the existing place (*again, crosses fingers*) and get into a new place, we'll also go the fixed 30YR route.  But, for those that might be looking to consolidate some high interest debt and paying it off fairly quickly, a home equity is a good option.  I mean, I don't see the Fed raising interest rates much anytime in the near future.  If they do, I doubt it'll be much more than a .5 increase.

As to the main point, I wouldn't be too concerned about getting into a 15YR fixed.  Roll with your 30YR and if you make one single extra payment a year (it has to be one lump payment, not paying off a little extra each month), you'll knock 5 to 6 years off the 30YR loan.  Do it twice and you're almost chopping 10 years off...give or take.
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« Reply #16 on: Jul 16, 2008 at 10:44 »

We sucked it up and did a 20YR fixed in our current house.  We will have it paid off when I'm 56, which hopefully makes retirement an easier choice.

If you are marginal on locking in a 20yr fixed, doing what AJ suggested is the next best way to do it.

You can use me as a DirecTV referral for the new house!!!!!!!
« Last Edit: Jul 16, 2008 at 10:50 by Big Virgil » Logged

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« Reply #17 on: Jul 16, 2008 at 12:05 »

Speaking of yards, the other day I let the dog out in the backyard, and he was chasing something.  So I saunter down to see what it is, and here he's got a groundhog trapped under the forsythia.  I'm calling him off because last thing I want is some rodent chewing his nose.  Nearby is our toolshed.  I get a shovel, and the hog is sitting under the bush chattering.  I aim and swing, knowing I'm swinging somewhat blindly and the thing will likely fly out of there anyway.  

I hear a dull metallic clang, the dog races in and proudly bounces back out, dead groundhog in his mouth, savior of humanity.  I get him to drop it, know Mrs. F. is due home any minute and will freak the fuck out.  I have it bagged and trashed and walk out calmly to meet her.

Bad news is, this is the small hog.  The BIG bastard was just out running around the other day...

See, this is the drama you will miss, Scac...

 
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« Reply #18 on: Jul 16, 2008 at 12:30 »

Quote
We sucked it up and did a 20YR fixed in our current house.  We will have it paid off when I'm 56, which hopefully makes retirement an easier choice.

If you are marginal on locking in a 20yr fixed, doing what AJ suggested is the next best way to do it.

You can use me as a DirecTV referral for the new house!!!!!!!
OR - depending on careers and kids, if you know you will only be there 5 or 6 years, go for the 30 year fixed to have less monthly cash outflow.  If you are never going to pay it off, keep the extra coin.
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« Reply #19 on: Jul 16, 2008 at 16:41 »

Congrats, SC.

Only two things I can think of off the top of my head.  When's the last time the roof was done?  Big potential expense if it's due for reshingling.

Second, check on the wood trimwork and make sure it's in good shape, and it's not half rotted out and painted over in spots.  Older house may actually be better off in this regard.   Our house is about 25 years old, slightly less, and I'm having to deal with a lot of it right now.  Dude who's looking at it says that since they got rid of the lead in the paint, you may as well put colored water on your wood for all the good it's doing you.  Also, not as good quality materials used.  Anyway, what looks like a small area of trouble can turn huge if not addressed.
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« Reply #20 on: Jul 16, 2008 at 22:41 »

Quote
I get him to drop it, know Mrs. F. is due home any minute and will freak the fuck out.
Do I have a sign on my lawn that says dead groundhog storage?
you know why you didn't see that sign? because it ain't there, because storing dead groundhogs ain't my fucking business, that's why
 
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« Reply #21 on: Jul 17, 2008 at 20:17 »

A few items from the home inspection....

1.  A little water damage in one bedroom ceiling.  It was there a month ago when we first saw the house.  Haven't spread or grown.  Roof was put on in early 2008, so it has a warranty.  Seller will use the roof warranty to look for leaks.  I asked that he repaint the ceiling area.

2.  No dryer vent (thanks for the heads-up jonrz).  It's a house from 1920, and probably has never had a w/d before.  This is a "must add"

3.  Kitchen cabinet needs to be fixed.  Area near door hinge is busted.  The door doesn't close properly.  Have asked to be fixed.

4.  A/C electrical out back needs clamps around the wires.  Have asked to be fixed.

5.  Front and basement door need door sweeps.  Have asked to be added.

6.  Front and basement door need new weather stripping.  Have asked to be added.

7.  Electrical outlet in kitchen needs to be replaced so that "reset" switch works.  Have asked to be added.

8.  Need PRV extended on hot water heater.  Asked to be added.

9.  D/W needs to be bolted to lower cabinets.  Have asked to be added

Not a big list, so I'm pretty happy.  I asked a ton of questions and used a lot of the info you all shared here (copper v. PVC, clear out, foundation, etc.).

The inspector felt the old houses have great foundations and wasn't concerned at all.  

Windows are new so he was pleased with that.  

All electrical outlets worked.  Running at 150A (maybe) for electrical?

HVAC is from 2007.

Skylights upstairs are well sealed.  

Tubs, toilets and sinks drain fast.  Hot H20 heater gets water heated quickly.  

Stove works, microwave works, and D/w work.  

The rest you all probably don't care about.

Good inspection.  Took two and a half hours.  But I learned a lot.


 
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« Reply #22 on: Jul 17, 2008 at 23:44 »

Quote
Quote
I get him to drop it, know Mrs. F. is due home any minute and will freak the fuck out.
Do I have a sign on my lawn that says dead groundhog storage?
you know why you didn't see that sign? because it ain't there, because storing dead groundhogs ain't my fucking business, that's why
Finny done got medieval on that hog's ass.
 
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« Reply #23 on: Jul 17, 2008 at 23:49 »

Congrats scacalaki, sounds like minor stuff that you'd expect.  It's good that the guy spent 2.5 hrs.
 
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« Reply #24 on: Jul 18, 2008 at 07:37 »

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No dryer vent (thanks for the heads-up jonrz).  It's a house from 1920, and probably has never had a w/d before.  This is a "must add"
It really is not necessary to have an external dryer vent. You can buy one from Lowe's for a few bucks that is an internal. We use one in our house. You fill it with water every few days, and it works like a charm. Just an FYI.
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« Reply #25 on: Jul 18, 2008 at 08:57 »

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No dryer vent (thanks for the heads-up jonrz).  It's a house from 1920, and probably has never had a w/d before.  This is a "must add"
It really is not necessary to have an external dryer vent. You can buy one from Lowe's for a few bucks that is an internal. We use one in our house. You fill it with water every few days, and it works like a charm. Just an FYI.

The rest sounds good.

What kind of heat and hot water?  We have oil for both, and while that's killing my wallet these days, I love the oil hot water/radiatiors.  Fuck ducting and allergens, it's a nice consistent heat, and adds steam in the dry of winter.  Oil hot water means you are NEVER without hot water.  It's instantanously ready.  We've also had natural gas, which is pretty nice.  Not a fan of electric.

We have 100A service that will likely be an update one of these days.  The breaker box looks like it was wired by a kid, and when I have done electrical (various internal and external light fixtures and switches, ceiling fan, range hood), it's been like traveling back in time: fat copper wires with that mummified insulation shredding off.  [*Shudder*]  Plus numerous outlets that just don't work.  Luckily, we are a pretty small footprint couple, and our bills are usually less than what most apartment dwellers pay.

Anyway, sounds like all your shit on that list is totally minor, unless #1 turns out to be a patch over a gunshot wound.

Post pics!
I was going to say the same thing, had heard of people venting internally.  Get that nice clean laundry smell.  Downside is you're blowing moisture somewhere internally, so not clear on whether that's a factor for mold.

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1. A little water damage in one bedroom ceiling. It was there a month ago when we first saw the house. Haven't spread or grown. Roof was put on in early 2008, so it has a warranty. Seller will use the roof warranty to look for leaks. I asked that he repaint the ceiling area.

Can you access the area above the ceiling?  Crawl space?  Could be a minor thing fixed by the roof repair, but I'd be curious to see if any of the framing is effed up.  Also, the spot where the leak is might not be directly below the point of entry: sometimes leak run along ceiling joists.  Might be worth investigating.
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« Reply #26 on: Jul 18, 2008 at 10:07 »

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I was going to say the same thing, had heard of people venting internally.  Get that nice clean laundry smell.  Downside is you're blowing moisture somewhere internally, so not clear on whether that's a factor for mold.

We have a dehumidifier downstairs to remove the moisture, so it's all good.
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« Reply #27 on: Jul 23, 2008 at 21:42 »

Heard back from the seller today re: the requests from the home inspection.

He'll accept all but two; those two being clamps for the A/C disconnect box and extending the pressure release valve on the H2O heater.

I thought myself pretty lucky as these are two minor things.  But I figured I didn't mind a minor negotiation so I countered that I would replace the H2O PRV but demanded that he put claimps on the AC disconnect wires.  

He accepted...one less thing I have to do.

Heard from the lender that the appraisal went through with no flaws.

Waiting to hear back from the seller on which home warranty he wants to purchase for us.

I can't imagine how it was a few years ago when there were 5 to 6 contracts on each house.  It's difficult to imagine not having the leverage we do right now.  

Have heard back from a bunch of moving companies (I still don't know anyone here in Baltimore).  Around $75-$90 per hour (4 hr minimum) for 2-3 movers and a truck.  Most don't charge for stairs, ,etc.  Not sure who I'll use yet.

Am trying to decide who I want to be my home insurance carrier...any suggestions?  I'm leaning towards Allstate.  We receive a lot of the home protection discounts due to a nice ADT system being included with the house (though I pay the $41/month for the service).
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« Reply #28 on: Jul 23, 2008 at 22:48 »

I have Allstate and haven't had any problems.  Get a discount for having the autos with them as well.  They paid a $12,000 claim the first year we moved in for hail damage to the roof.
 
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« Reply #29 on: Jul 23, 2008 at 23:43 »

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They paid a $12,000 claim the first year we moved in for hail damage to the roof.
That wasn't hail.  That was just Otis sneezing.
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« Reply #30 on: Jul 24, 2008 at 08:42 »

Whatever insurance company you choose, definitely bundle your vehicles, and whatever else.  Since you are going throgh the insurance process, and you have a home now, you should seriously consider some life insurance.  A lot of people get some nominal amount through work, but you should have a policy that is "portable".  JMHO, that I feel strongly about.

As far as the movers go, box up everything that that will fit into a box.  That will save time as the move will go quicker.

Onelas thing, be sure to use me as your DirecTV referral and don't forget to schedule your install for move in day.  
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« Reply #31 on: Aug 14, 2008 at 15:08 »

Just got back from signing/closing on the house.  Whew, that's a lot of info.

Movers arrive Saturday.  

I woke up last night realizing I hadn't checked to see if the washing maching hook-up had a waste line.

Scary shit.

Though the scariest shit is the likely reassessment of the property and the new tax bill.  
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« Reply #32 on: Aug 14, 2008 at 15:17 »

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Though the scariest shit is the likely reassessment of the property and the new tax bill.
No doubt.  I've never done this but plan to each year - get values and price per sq ft from the tax role for my area and make sure the county isn't raping me too badly.  One assumes they are.
 
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