Maximum Grilled Steelers Forum
Jul 30, 2014 at 20:41 *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
 
  Home   Forum   Help Calendar Media Login Register  
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 ... 11   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: MGS Weight Loss 2009  (Read 7632 times)
jonzr
Asst. VP, Jonzring
Global Moderator
Old School Member
*****

Karma: 11361
Offline Offline

Posts: 11,395


Have a cup o' joe.


WWW
« Reply #20 on: Jan 29, 2009 at 09:02 »

The chubby spouse thing is a slippery slope.  I think it goes both ways. 

Looking svelt (sp?) for the wedding, and honeymoon, is a good way to go.

Yeah bamf, you should certainly try to be at your prettiest for those events!
Logged

"I like David Bowie, he was always my favorite member of Tin Machine."
- Rodney Anonymous

It's a Steeler Nation
pensodyssey
Halfsharkalligator halfman.
Global Moderator
Old School Member
*****

Karma: 8119
Offline Offline

Posts: 9,694



« Reply #21 on: Jan 29, 2009 at 09:26 »

The chubby spouse thing is a slippery slope.  I think it goes both ways. 

Looking svelt (sp?) for the wedding, and honeymoon, is a good way to go.

Yeah bamf, you should certainly try to be at your prettiest for those events!


What's next, an MGS cosmetics thread?
Logged

A shabby Charlie Brown.
Finnegans Wake
Global Moderator
Old School Member
*****

Karma: 12188
Offline Offline

Posts: 22,198



« Reply #22 on: Jan 29, 2009 at 09:35 »

The chubby spouse thing is a slippery slope.  I think it goes both ways. 

Looking svelt (sp?) for the wedding, and honeymoon, is a good way to go.

Yeah bamf, you should certainly try to be at your prettiest for those events!


What's next, an MGS cosmetics thread?


We may need to borrow the Penso Puffy ShirtTM collection for the photo shoot.  I think the Dolce will go well with the Newt jacket...
Logged

Out of my mind on Saturday night...
dare2beme
Member
***

Karma: 803
Offline Offline

Posts: 395



« Reply #23 on: Jan 29, 2009 at 09:44 »

I'll have to break out my Rainbow Little Pony temporary tattoo for the occasion.
Logged

If you ain't a Steeler fan, you're just a Jag-off...especially here in Jacksonburgh, FL!
Big Virgil
Old School Member
*****

Karma: 3768
Offline Offline

Posts: 3,245



« Reply #24 on: Jan 29, 2009 at 11:38 »

A lot to respond to in BV's post, but that's for another time.

All I can say is, if you're using non-dairy creamer (like Coffee Mate), that shit is pure DEATH.  You'd be better off using a whole cup of real cream than any amount of that stuff.  Seriously.  That shit will shred your arteries.  You'll be biking along, burning 8400 calories one day, and the ticker will freeze up and BAM.  Brinkered.

It is NOT just about quantitive stuff (total calories, e.g), but also qualitative (which is why even butter is better than margerine, olive oil is indeed better than vegetable oils, and cream is better than non-dairy creamers).

I need to post my reading list soon...

I certainly don't want to be brinkered!!!!!!!

My post was a general response, not necessarily to you specifically.

I have read the stuff about being better off eating the butter ad cream, etc, but I just can't do it.  Same with diet soda.  I do minimize that intake but I just can't make myself drink regular any more.  I do think people "go wrong" with the nuts and oils.  You'd be better off with olive oil spray, and putting what is equivalent of 1/4 or 1/3 cup of oil in a pan to cook with.  I nuts aren't measured out, people eat the equivalent of 5 or 6 servings which is 60 or 70 grams of fat.  Yeah, it is good fat, but since you only want to be at about 50 for a day, that is waaaaaaay to much for one snack.  That is probably more of a pet peeve of mine than anything.

I'm sure "quality" foods are better, but to what extent for the cost, and I'm thinking about organic bananas vs non-organic.  Since those organic foods didn't exist when I was a kid, and it didn't matter if they did, becasue were were still eating SPAM and spinach out of a can.

I did grab an antimicrobial pen from the supply closet today, so I'm on my way.

LETS TALK SOME FOOTBALL!!!!11111111
Logged

Looks like you've been missing a lot of work lately.
I wouldn't say I've been *missing* it, Bob.
Finnegans Wake
Global Moderator
Old School Member
*****

Karma: 12188
Offline Offline

Posts: 22,198



« Reply #25 on: Jan 29, 2009 at 14:05 »

I think we're at opposite ends of the nutrition spectrum.  I understand what you're saying about over-indulgence in the good fats, and I agree that a part of proper nutrition should be balance: not over-eating is part of that balance. 

To give you an example of qualitative differences between fats, let's look at "good" soybean oil and "bad" old lard.

Everyone hears about omega 3 fatty acids, how they are good at keeping your heart and brain healthy, lowering depression, and so on.  (Icelanders eat approximately 250 pounds of fish per year, fatty ocean fish as opposed to farm raised, and have mega amounts of omega 3; they also suffer very little depression.  Americans eat 50 pounds of fish, and suffer from low omega 3 levels.  Cf., The Jungle Effect, by Dr. Daphne Miller.)  You don't hear as much about omega 6 or omega 9 fatty acids, and it's good to have all of these in the proper proportion.

The problem is that the optimal ratio would be 1:1 for omega 3 to omega 6; Americans tend to get 20 times as much omega 6 fatty acid compared to omega 3.  (I would imagine that ratio continues to rise over the years as well.)   The problem with all these processed foods we as Americans eat is that they are crammed full of omega 6 fatty acids, which mess up that optimal ratio.  Omega 3s are anti-inflammatory, while omega 6s are inflammatory.  At one time, in our hunter-gatherer years, man needed those omega 6s in abundance, because inflammation would help heal cuts and wounds.  Nowadays, that inflammatory property has led to greater heart disease, blood pressure, and cancer.  (Cf. Anticancer, by Dr. David Servain-Schreiber.)

So, back to soybean oil.  Soybeans, like corn, are a Federally subsidized crop, as part of the Farm Bill.  What this means is that farmers over-produce to get subsidies, prices drop, and farmers end up making no money, as Monsanto and DuPont make money on the front end selling all the seeds and fertilizers, and food processors like ADM and the like get the soybeans at a cheap price that we taxpayers are shelling out for (Cf. The Omnivore's Dilemma, Michael Pollan.)  The politics of taxpayer money lining these corporate pockets aside, we have most of our American food supply -- all those ingredients you don't what the fuck they are are likely derivatives of corn, soy, or petroleum (Cf. Twinkie Deconstructed, Steve Ettlinger; Omnivore).  So while people think "soy" and magically connect this to "healthful," it really isn't.

Soy, like other vegetable oils (corn, sunflower, safflower, and cottonseed), are not oils that have been used in traditional cooking.  In other words, they are modern cooking oils, mostly from the 19th and 20th century.  (Traditional fats, like butter, lard, olive oil, and nut oils, appear to keep the diseases of "civilization" such as diabetes, cancer, heart disease, high blood pressure, asthma, etc., at a statistical minimum; cf. Nutrition and Physical Degeneration, Dr. Weston Price; Jungle Effect; Real Food, Nina Planck.)

Soybean oil is about 8:1 omega 6 to omega 3, for one thing.  Its sheer ubiquity is another: crackers, salad dressings, cookies, cereal, and everything in between.  (Another good reason to avoid processed foods, anything pre-made, and make your own.)  One tablespoon of soy or corn oil is all you need in a day of omega 6s, but not likely to be all you get.  By saturating your body with omega 6 fatty acids, you are creating a fertile ground for cancers to multiply, for heart disease to take hold, and all sorts of other issues.

On top of that, soybeans are one of the crops with the highest percentage of genetically modified seed (along with corn).  There is a huge debate as to how safe this will be long-term for human consumption, especially in the mind-boggling quantities Americans eat these GMOs, not to mention some question as to environmental impact.  Some GMO seed has pesticides strapped right into the genetic code, which has a lot of downstream problems (cf. Omnivore), and some scientists link that to such things as the honey bee colony collapse disorder.  In short, America is one big fat fucking guineau pig to corporate profiteering with Frankenfoods: welcome to our national nightmare that no one talks about.

Oh, and soybeans are turned into oil by treating them with hexane, which, if you don't know, is a petroleum distillate used to process soy and other vegetable oils.  Yes, even canola, another "healthy" oil of dubious parentage (also a big GMO crop).  Sure, the hexane is boiled out, so only trace amounts remain.  In 400-600 ppm of chronic exposure, as might be expected with a diet flooded with vegetable oils, toxic neuropathy can occur.  That's OK, though, because it also messes with your protein function, causes muscle weakness, coordination issues, and atrophying of muscles.  But I'm sure it's all in safe levels in our food.  Because, hey, there are never any issues with our industrialized food processing (peanuts with salmonella, beef with E. Coli, veggies with E. Coli, chicken with salmonella, all in industrial scale processors).

So, the hexane and GMOs probably won't get you, because your omega 6s will already be making you sick by the time you're 60.  But if not, something to look forward to.

Lard, or rendered pig fat, may be familiar if you had a grandma who saved bacon drippings for cooking.  It's still widely used in indigenous cooking, like Mexican cooking.  Only a little is needed to impart flavor, and its high smoke point means it doesn't rancidify, or turn loose oxidative compounds.  It's also mostly unsaturated fat, being 39% saturated, while having 45% mono-unsaturated fats (like walnut oil and olive oil are rich in).  Monounsaturated fats are a big part of the so-called Mediterranean diet (cf. Jungle Effect), which actually helps with weight and heart related issues. 

Ounce for ounce, I would cook with lard over soybean oil any day.  Lard, chicken fat, duck fat, goose fat, and beef tallow all are traditional cooking fats, and as noted previously, prior to the 19th and 20th century, incidence of diseases of "civilization," even among long-lived people, was virtually nil.  People might not have lived as long, but it wasn't because of cancer, heart attacks, or diabetes: it was farming accidents, bacterial and viral agents, and other pathogenic diseases that were at the top of the list.

And again, it even depends on the quality of the product you buy, since rendered fat from pigs fed a healthy diet (pastured, not feed-lot or CAFO; cf. www.eatwild.com, Omnivore) will produce a product with a better nutritional napshot.  Butter from pastured cows may be high in saturated fats, but those fats do not rancidify and become oxidative, and may have higher levels of good compounds like conjugated linoleic acid, and (again) those omega 3 and omega 6 FAs in better ratios.  There's also some evidence of higher levels of vitamins A and D, the latter of which most Americans seem to be slightly deficient in.

Fats, per se, are not bad.  Your brain is composed of 80% fat; this is yet another reason those EPA and DHA in fish oils are so important: fish really is "brain food."  Fats also help with the absorption of certain nutrients.  Traditional cooking knows this well: scientists learn that lycopene absorbtion is aided by a fat such as olive oil, so that Italian grandma simmering garlic (anticancer agents, also good for blood sugar and BP) along with tomatoes in olive oil, she was passing along good nutrition, and good taste.  You find these astounding combinations of traditional, low-glycemic index carbs (unrefined), traditional fats, vegetables, meats, cheeses, herbs, etc., combined in dishes prepared as they were for hundreds and even thousands of years, and scientists start saying, Aha, these are really healthful combinations!

Like Indian spices (cooked with ghee, or clarified butter) being tremendous anti-inflammatory agents and anticancer agents (turmeric and black pepper -- cf. Anticancer -- ginger, garlic, onions, etc.)  Italian cooking.  Greek cooking.  Japanese cooking.  African cooking.  Any stable traditional cuisine before westernized versions take over.  Before McDonalds takes over. 

I personally use these cooking fats, in about this order of preference:  olive oil (virgin for cooking, extra virgin for dressing); butter (usually with vegetables, not too much); the rest are used far, far less... coconut oil or lard for frying; sesame oil, for dressing; and that's about it.  Don't do a lot of frying, reserving that as a treat. 
Logged

Out of my mind on Saturday night...
otismalibu
Global Moderator
Old School Member
*****

Karma: 7051
Offline Offline

Posts: 10,879



« Reply #26 on: Jan 29, 2009 at 14:20 »

Quote
I do think people "go wrong" with the nuts and oils.

But it feels so right!

Logged
Finnegans Wake
Global Moderator
Old School Member
*****

Karma: 12188
Offline Offline

Posts: 22,198



« Reply #27 on: Jan 29, 2009 at 14:28 »

Quote
I do think people "go wrong" with the nuts and oils.

But it feels so right!


Take it to the Tampa thread, ladies...
Logged

Out of my mind on Saturday night...
dare2beme
Member
***

Karma: 803
Offline Offline

Posts: 395



« Reply #28 on: Jan 29, 2009 at 16:06 »

If one is allergic to fish and seafood, what are the other alternatives to getting omega-3s, besides olive oil?
Logged

If you ain't a Steeler fan, you're just a Jag-off...especially here in Jacksonburgh, FL!
pensodyssey
Halfsharkalligator halfman.
Global Moderator
Old School Member
*****

Karma: 8119
Offline Offline

Posts: 9,694



« Reply #29 on: Jan 29, 2009 at 16:37 »

Quote
Your brain is composed of 80% fat

Your brain, maybe.  My brain bikes with BV.
Logged

A shabby Charlie Brown.
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 ... 11   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  


Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.19 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
SimplePortal 2.3.5 © 2008-2012, SimplePortal
| Sitemap
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!