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Author Topic: Tomlin presser after the game  (Read 1940 times)
pensodyssey
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« Reply #20 on: Jan 14, 2012 at 08:25 »

You cannot honestly say that Tomlin gets the most out of his players and coaches.

We've had two DPOYs under Tomlin.  We've watched Tomlin groom the best receiving corps in the NFL-- we have two pro bowl wrs on the roster.  How much more can we get from Legursky, from Hoke, from Keisel?  Many on this board have felt Redman was underutilized this season, but you certainly can't say he wasn't ready to ball versus Denver.  UDFA brought in under Tomlin.

No, we flat disagree here.  I believe the players love playing for Tomlin and many have translated that into careers transcending their raw physical ability. 
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scballersc
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Saw Ben on Halloween (pre-Milledgeville)


« Reply #21 on: Jan 14, 2012 at 10:51 »

Things are never as good as they seem, but never as bad they seem either. 

Really, it is very difficult to objectively evaluate a coach, especially one that is surrounded by talent (or vice versa).  Two objective criticisms I have (and I think most agree) are:

1. Tomlin has repeatedly demonstrated an inability to manage the clock (and in some instances, other game-management decisions).

2. Tomlin has done nothing to check/reign in the abortion that is our OC. 

Off the top of my head, Tomlin is 43-21 in the regular season and 5-3 in the postseason, which is pretty damn good.  But to say it is completely indicative of him being a great coach is just false.  To say he is an awful coach is just not true.  Really, there are just too many moving variables to accurately evaluate other aspects of his coaching, e.g. his ability/inability to make in-game adjustments, draft, etc, and I think that has long been the Rooney rationale.  Tomlin will remain, as long as he continues to win at this kind of clip.  However, Tomlin will never be a great coach unless he can improve on the two elements of coaching listed above.
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jonzr
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Have a cup o' joe.


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« Reply #22 on: Jan 14, 2012 at 13:26 »

Things are never as good as they seem, but never as bad they seem either. 

Really, it is very difficult to objectively evaluate a coach, especially one that is surrounded by talent (or vice versa).  Two objective criticisms I have (and I think most agree) are:

1. Tomlin has repeatedly demonstrated an inability to manage the clock (and in some instances, other game-management decisions).

2. Tomlin has done nothing to check/reign in the abortion that is our OC. 

Off the top of my head, Tomlin is 43-21 in the regular season and 5-3 in the postseason, which is pretty damn good.  But to say it is completely indicative of him being a great coach is just false.  To say he is an awful coach is just not true.  Really, there are just too many moving variables to accurately evaluate other aspects of his coaching, e.g. his ability/inability to make in-game adjustments, draft, etc, and I think that has long been the Rooney rationale.  Tomlin will remain, as long as he continues to win at this kind of clip.  However, Tomlin will never be a great coach unless he can improve on the two elements of coaching listed above.


I can get behind that.
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aj_law
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« Reply #23 on: Jan 17, 2012 at 11:25 »

Things are never as good as they seem, but never as bad they seem either. 

Really, it is very difficult to objectively evaluate a coach, especially one that is surrounded by talent (or vice versa).  Two objective criticisms I have (and I think most agree) are:

1. Tomlin has repeatedly demonstrated an inability to manage the clock (and in some instances, other game-management decisions).

2. Tomlin has done nothing to check/reign in the abortion that is our OC. 

Off the top of my head, Tomlin is 43-21 in the regular season and 5-3 in the postseason, which is pretty damn good.  But to say it is completely indicative of him being a great coach is just false.  To say he is an awful coach is just not true.  Really, there are just too many moving variables to accurately evaluate other aspects of his coaching, e.g. his ability/inability to make in-game adjustments, draft, etc, and I think that has long been the Rooney rationale.  Tomlin will remain, as long as he continues to win at this kind of clip.  However, Tomlin will never be a great coach unless he can improve on the two elements of coaching listed above.


Well put.

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We suck because our drafts have been THE SUCK.
Bubby
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« Reply #24 on: Jan 17, 2012 at 18:47 »

If anyone is 'probably just a racist' on this board, it is the guy with the pic of himself butt fucking a turkey.

Actually, that's Bubby Brister butt fucking a dead turkey.

&

I totally agree with the above assessment: clock management and failure to do something about Arians are the two major flaws for this dude thus far. However, perfection is not anticipated or expected from anyone...in anything...ever.
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