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Author Topic: 2013 Steelers draft  (Read 17413 times)
aj_law
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« Reply #190 on: Apr 26, 2013 at 20:30 »

Guess I'll be in the minority because I like the pick.  He was a top 3 RB for me, but that was really personal preference as there are probably 3 or 4 guys that most would rank ahead of him.

Could they have drafted him later?  Probably.  A trade back to grab a pick may have been an option, but I suppose it's possible that he was on another team's radar.

Can't say who he reminds me of, tho.
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TwistedLemon
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« Reply #191 on: Apr 26, 2013 at 20:32 »

Stedman has decent but not great speed.....just looked slow running with Tavon

Quinton Patton of Louis Tech or Stedman would make me happy
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« Reply #192 on: Apr 26, 2013 at 20:36 »

Markus who...
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aj_law
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« Reply #193 on: Apr 26, 2013 at 20:43 »

Markus who...

Markus Wheaton

OVERVIEW
Wheaton might not be biggest receiver in the 2013 draft class, but he towers above the last two playmakers coming out of Corvallis –- Jacquizz and James Rodgers, who averaged about 5-foot-6, 190 pounds at their respective combines. His athleticism certainly matches up with the Rodgers brothers, as well, because not only was Wheaton a solid high school football talent among the best players coming out of Arizona in 2008, but he also won 400- and 800-meter races at junior national track meets before also performing well in state high school meets.

His speed and athleticism translated onto the field as a true freshman, as he was used on fly sweeps (11 rushes for 79 yards and a score) and as a reserve receiver (8-89). Wheaton led the Beavers in receiving in 2010, starting eight of 12 games played with James Rodgers on the sideline (55-675, four TD) and was again used regularly on sweeps (27-220, two TD), finishing the year with a 10-catch, 137-yard effort against rival Oregon (where his cousin, Kenny, played in the mid-1990s) in the Civil War. He earned honorable mention All-Pac 12 honors while starting all 12 games as a junior, again leading the team in receiving (73-986, TD) and contributing as a runner (25-190).

In 2012, Wheaton eclipsed the 1,000-yard barrier, catching 91 passes for 1,244 yards and 11 touchdowns.
ANALYSIS
STRENGTHS His quickness is blatant and dangerous. Whether taking off from the slot or outside, his feet are literally a step ahead of his defender on everything from speed outs, crossers, to jerk routes. Displays the flexibility to grab throws behind him or over his shoulder when running deep. He’ll also extend away from his body to bring in high or wide throws, and will stutter on the sideline to ensure he makes the catch in-bounds. Possesses some thickness to his frame, and is willing to lower his shoulder to get the extra yard – often diving under defenders to get as many as possible. Wheaton also dabbled in track while at OSU, reminding scouts of his elite speed.
WEAKNESSES While he can elude defenders in the open field, he’s not necessarily elite making men miss after the catch. Too often he will let the ball into his frame as opposed to attacking it. Will round off deeper pattern that consist of him coming back to the quarterback. Can be overwhelmed by physical corners in his route, and especially at the line of scrimmage. Inconsistent as a blocker. Willing, but too often will fall off his block, or allow his man to simply overpower him.
NFL COMPARISON Antonio Brown
BOTTOM LINE In 2012, Wheaton became the Beavers' all-time leader in receptions. Wheaton used his track speed to break off long runs from short routes and get behind defenders for big plays. Wheaton isn't solely limited to the slot, and he will likely find himself as a first or second round selection due to his ability to test defenses horizontally and vertically.
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TwistedLemon
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« Reply #194 on: Apr 26, 2013 at 20:54 »

Overall:  Round 1:  Would have preferred a trade back for more picks but provided he stays healthy not overly disappointed.  Round 2:  Do not like it.  Dont think he is a bad player, just a reach for the round and could have been there at 3 maybe 4.  Round 3:  Not horrible, but would have preferred Stedman or Patton at WR.

Official feeing of draft thus far........eh
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Y2Joyce
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« Reply #195 on: Apr 26, 2013 at 20:56 »

He Brandon Wheaton's son or grandson?

A civil war hero with big production who compares to Antonio Brown? Not bad.
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« Reply #196 on: Apr 26, 2013 at 20:57 »

A civil war hero

What's his time in the furlong?
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« Reply #197 on: Apr 26, 2013 at 21:00 »

Don't necessarily agree with the Blount comparison for Bell.  Still can't think of a current similar player...maybe a beefier Fred Jackson or Darren McFadden?  Don't think he's as much of a bruiser as Blount, but he doesn't generally shy away from contact either.  Can move the pile when necessary, yet quick enough to get to the edge.  He weighs about the same as Mendenhall, but plays bigger.  Decent hands out of the backfield.  Think he runs a little too upright and I'm not crazy about his propensity to hurdle defenders.  Only slightly less annoying than Mendenhall's constant dancing.

Le'Veon Bell

OVERVIEW
Bell wasn't highly coveted by major programs early in the recruiting process, being offered by hometown Ohio State and others as a safety and nearly going to the MAC to play running back before Michigan State stepped up with their scholarship. But his senior season flourish (1,333 yards, 21 touchdowns) got MSU on his scent, and they've been happy for it ever since.

His start as a true freshman was so good that he joined the Doak Walker Award watch list during the season; most of his 605 rushing yards and eight scores came in the first six weeks of the year, before Edwin Baker finished off the year as the lead back. Bell flipped the script on Baker in 2011, however, starting the last six games after coming off the bench over the first eight (182-948, 13 TD; 35-267 receiving). Big Ten coaches named him honorable mention all-conference for his efforts.

In his junior season, Bell had the backfield all to himself, and the Spartans certainly got the most out of him. Bell carried the football 382 times, en route to rushing for 1,793 yards and 12 touchdowns, earning himself numerous postseason accolades.
ANALYSIS
STRENGTHS Big, bruising back with power in his lower body but lighter feet than you'd expect give his size. North-south runner effective in one and two-back sets. Strong cuts and a nice burst out of them makes him capable of breaking off big runs when the hole is available. Sets up defenders in the open field to cut away. Flashes some stop-start ability and shake in space that freezes oncoming defenders. Pushes piles with lower body strength. Can lower his pads for contact, churn through tackle attempts to become difficult to bring down due to second and third efforts. Wiggles and pushes through traffic inside to get the extra yard after it looks as though he's stopped. Possesses a spin move to come off tackles at the second level, maintains balance to keep on moving or at least fall forward for an extra couple of yards. Uses a strong stiff arm in space, as well. Agile enough to jump over defenders trying to cut him down in the open field. Used in Wildcat formation in the red zone. Decent receiver out of the backfield.
WEAKNESSES Taller back who presents a big target for defenders to hit, especially when failing to lower his pads going into the hole. Size also limits his breakaway speed and ability to create on his own if challenged by better front sevens.Sub par vision prevents him from seeing cut back lines and sees him running up the back of his lead blocker too often. Pass protection form is inconsistent, has size to handle rushers or at least push them around the pocket, but often moves his feet too slowly or tries to cut instead of setting to anchor. Holds the ball away from his body at times, though he doesn't fumble very often.
NFL COMPARISON LeGarrette Blount
BOTTOM LINE Bell has monster size, but also shows nimble feet. Can make people miss at any level of the field, but doesn't have very good vision. As the season progressed, Bell's lateral agility declined. Bell proved capable of handling a tremendous amount of touches. To become a full-time back though, Bell will need to continue to improve his ability as a pass catcher or become a more consistent blocker, in addition to improving his vision as a runner.
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« Reply #198 on: Apr 26, 2013 at 21:03 »

Jarvis Jones

OVERVIEW
Despite earning many All-American honors as a high school star in Columbus, Ga., Jones initially took his game to Southern California to play for Trojans head coach Pete Carroll. Unfortunately, a neck injury suffered in his eighth game as a true freshman (13 tackles, 1.5 for loss) sidelined him for the rest of the year. Then Carroll left for the NFL after the season, and new coach Lane Kiffin and his staff weren't sure Jones should suit up for them again. Doctors at the University of Georgia felt differently about Jones' neck, clearing him to play and clearing the way for him to transfer back home -– much to the dismay of opposing offenses.

He redshirted the 2010 season in order to be fully healthy and prepared for SEC competition. That offseason work paid big dividends in his sophomore season, as he was named a finalist for the Butkus Award and garnered consensus All-American and first-team All-SEC honors. The team captain started all 14 games, racking up 70 tackles, 19.5 for loss (which led the SEC) and 13.5 sacks (led the SEC, tied for fifth in the country). His four sacks helped the team win its annual rivalry game with Florida and earned him many national defensive player of the week awards. Jones stayed productive in 2012 as a redshirt junior, leading the nation in three categories: sacks (14.5, school record), tackles for loss (24.5, school record) and forced fumbles (7). Add 85 tackles, 4 passes defended and an interception and Jones was one of the top defenders in the country and was a finalist for the Bednarik, Lombardi, Nagurski, Butkus and Lott awards.
ANALYSIS
STRENGTHS Versatile linebacker with a chance to play inside or outside. Possesses a very good first step to pressure tackles' upfield shoulder. Also has closing speed and short-area quickness to keep contain outside and crash down on inside runs. Strong tackler with excellent length and upper-body strength to wrap up ball carriers. Gets under the pads of tackles, keeps his feet churning to maintain leverage. Brings heavy hands, can rip off to get around the edge or cut inside to stop quarterbacks from stepping up in the pocket. Works through double-teams if the quarterback hangs onto the ball in the pocket. Holds his ground against pulling guards and fullbacks. Capable of locking up tight ends off the edge in coverage, also sorts out multiple routes in his direction to make a play on the correct one. Gets his hands up to affect passing lanes.
WEAKNESSES One-year starter. Inconsistent using his hands to disengage from better blocks and to beat cut blocks from running backs in pass protection. Lacks an ideal frame to get much bigger and doesn't have the growth potential or the bulk teams want at the position. Will need to prove he can stay with NFL ball carriers in space when dropping into the flat. Not particularly smooth in deep drops. Doesn't have elite bend around the corner, and could use a spin or other counter move to keep tackles guessing. Missed the last five games of the 2009 with a neck injury, part of his senior year in high school with a broken thumb. There is some concern about his long-term durability due to his spinal stenosis condition, the same ailment that has caused some players to call it quits, including Marcus McNeill, Chris Samuels and Michael Irvin.
NFL COMPARISON Bruce Irvin
BOTTOM LINE The Peach State native suffered a neck injury his true freshman year at USC, but returned home when cleared by Georgia doctors; the consensus All-American impressed scouts in 2011 with his ability to rush the passer and he didn't let up in 2012, leading the nation in sacks, tackles for loss and forced fumbles. Jones also showed the versatility to play the run and get the job done in coverage. He enters the NFL with some questions with his struggles disengaging at the point of attack and limited length and growth potential, but the production speaks for itself and, as Bruce Irvin reminded us last April, pass rushers don't last long on draft day. Whether or not he would be able to fit in a 4-3 defense like Irvin would depend on how he is used, but he would fit best as a pass rush OLB in a 3-4 like in college.
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« Reply #199 on: Apr 26, 2013 at 21:09 »

Guess I'll be in the minority because I like the pick.  He was a top 3 RB for me, but that was really personal preference as there are probably 3 or 4 guys that most would rank ahead of him.

Could they have drafted him later?  Probably.  A trade back to grab a pick may have been an option, but I suppose it's possible that he was on another team's radar.

Can't say who he reminds me of, tho.

+1 I love this draft and you guys will also!
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